Posts Tagged ‘Slate’

Cheeps and Chirps — belated July 2016 Democratic National Convention edition!

August 12, 2016

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Aug. 12, 2016

Yep — have some more Twitter!

• Comedy!

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Recent Readings for Jan. 9, 2016

January 9, 2016

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Jan. 9, 2016

• “The Fall of King Coal.” In December, a federal jury convicted former Massey Energy Chief Executive Don Blankenship of conspiracy to violate federal mine-safety laws, a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of a year in prison. In “The Fall of King Coal,” which Mother Jones published in the fall as Massey’s trial was getting under way, reporter Tim Murphy took a close look at Blankenship’s career, which involved breaking union strikes as well as existing contracts and safety and environmental regulations.

“It was very, very obvious from the first part that [Blankenship] cared about one thing and one thing only, and that was the dollar, and it was clear that he worshipped at the altar of greed and dollars, and he wouldn’t let anything get in the way,” one longtime union foe told Murphy.

• “The Corporate Takeover of the Red Cross.” The American Red Cross did not have a good 2015, when several reports came out exposing it as a floundering and at times ineffective organization. Take, for instance, a June report from ProPublica and NPR that bore the headline “How the Red Cross Raised Half a Billion Dollars for Haiti and Built Six Homes.”

Last month, Justin Elliott extended his reporting on the American Red Cross by describing how former AT&T executive Gail McGovern has brought a businesslike mentality to the charity that has coincided with, if not actually caused, budget deficits, layoffs, internal cutbacks, sagging morale and the loss of trust by countless volunteers and partners. One of McGovern’s apparent missteps was hiring Jack McMaster, a former AT&T colleague who ran a Dutch telecom company into the ground before getting a job with the Red Cross.

• “Republican doom doesn’t equal Democrat victory: Our political chaos could destroy them both.” Salon columnist Andrew O’Hehir blasts the left and the right in this essay:

Clinton’s tone and rhetoric have been measured during this campaign, but as Salon’s Bill Curry wrote recently, she remains an unregenerate foreign-policy hawk who shows every sign of yearning to double down on failed military overreach. Whatever you think she may have said, Clinton has absolutely not ruled out sending American troops by the thousands to fight a ground war against the Islamic State. She has called out Republican candidates for their “bluster and bigotry” and rejected talk of a “war on Islam,” which is all to the good. But the policy proposals discernible below her calm and resolute-sounding language over the last month are virtually indistinguishable from those of the non-Trump GOP contenders: More war, more surveillance, less First Amendment. “You are going to hear all the familiar complaints: ‘Freedom of speech,’” she told a Brookings Institution audience on Dec. 6. I know! As if that’s in the Constitution or something!

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Deficits as far as the eye can see: An overview of the Republican presidential candidates’ tax plans

November 11, 2015

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Nov. 11, 2015

Last month, I examined a common theme in the tax reform plans of seemingly every Republican presidential candidate: The notion that, as Donald Trump’s tax plan states, massive tax cuts for the rich can be “fully paid for by…[r]educing or eliminating most deductions and loopholes available to the very rich.”

I criticized this idea on the grounds that removing a wide swath of deductions and loopholes (part of a budget category that policy wonks call “tax expenditures”) is extremely difficult to do. Some of these expenditures, such as the mortgage-interest deduction for home purchasers, are widely popular, even though they do little to promote their intended policy goals. And some of these expenditures have the backing of interest groups that routinely spend hundreds of millions of dollars annually on lobbying, political contributions and the like.

My fear is that our next Republican president might (read: would) prioritize implementing their program of tax-rate reductions over enacting the reduction and reform of tax expenditures. That, of course, would produce a fundamentally untenable budget situation, one where the revenue loss from tax cuts would not be zeroed out by voiding tax expenditures. In this scenario, the United States would face a significant built-in annual deficit.

The ultimate result, of course, would almost certainly be radical cutbacks in government services — unless Congress and the president agreed to hike tax rates substantially. But that’s hard to do even when the two major political parties don’t have ideological differences as deep as they’ve become in the early 21st century.

I stand by what I wrote. However, I must confess that my earlier post ignored the real issue.

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