Posts Tagged ‘Ripley’s Game’

Ripley and Terry: Stumbling upon another unexpected movie-making connection

February 13, 2015

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Feb. 13, 2015

Author’s note: I love finding connections between things, and I especially enjoy when my blog helps me stumble upon links. Here’s another instance of that. MEM

The other week, I went to a used bookstore and traded in some books and DVDs for different books and DVDs.

One of my new books was Next by James Hynes. I also got four movies in three DVD cases: A Will Smith science fiction action movie twofer containing Independence Day and I, Robot; the apocalyptic time-travel masterpiece 12 Monkeys; and Ripley’s Game, which is based on one of Patricia Highsmith’s novels.

As noted in my previous post, the script for Ripley’s Game was co-written by director Liliana Cavani with Charles McKeown. What I didn’t realize before I clicked on McKeown’s Internet Movie Database page was that he connects the last two movies that I wrote about on this blog.

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Murder, he schemed: A bourgeois sociopath strikes again in the masterful ‘Ripley’s Game’

February 12, 2015

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Feb. 12, 2015

About two-thirds of the way through the 2002 movie Ripley’s Game, after Tom Ripley has snuffed out the lives of a few Eastern European gangsters, his appalled companion notes that he hardly knows the man standing beside him.

This is a statement, not a question, but Ripley — played with a cool detachment by John Malkovich — regards it as an invitation to explain a little about himself. In one of the longest speeches of the movie, Ripley says, “I’m a creation. A gifted improviser. I lack your conscience, and when I was young that troubled me. It no longer does. I don’t worry about being caught because I don’t believe anyone is watching. The world is not a poorer place because those people are dead. It’s one less car on the road. It’s a little less noise and menace.”

Ripley’s nonchalance is both chilling and thrilling. How cold-blooded it is of him to dismiss the deaths as “one less car on the road,” never questioning whether the dead men had a parent or a sibling or a child or a lover who might miss them.

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