Posts Tagged ‘Lavie Tidhar’

Human evolution moves in new and strange ways in ‘Central Station,’ Lavie Tidhar’s loosely linked 2016 novel about future Tel Aviv

April 29, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 29, 2019

Central Station, Lavie Tidhar’s 2016 novel, is a rambling meditation on the nature of humanity and the possible directions our species might take in the coming decades.

Tidhar envisions a future Israel that has been apportioned and has achieved a measure of stability. Palestine includes what has become the city of Jaffa, while Jews retain the remainder of Tel Aviv and other parts of today’s Israeli territory. The space port of Central Station straddles the two cities, uniting and dividing them, funneling people and goods both into and out of the sector.

The port serves as a gateway to colonies all around the solar system. But that doesn’t entirely explain Central Station’s amazing diversity: The neighborhood boasts creatures of many ethnicities and native tongues. Some of these are very familiar, others are fantastic and still others are wholly intangible — and a number, like the port, straddle different categories of existence.

Tidhar, an Israeli, begins to outline Central Station’s huge variety with this passage near the start of his book:

The rain caught them by surprise. The space port, this great white whale, like a living mountain rising out of the urban bedrock, drew onto itself the formation of clouds, its very own miniature weather system. Like islands in the ocean, space ports saw localized rains, cloudy skies, and a growth industry of mini-farms growing like lichen on the side of their vast edifices. 

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Science fiction anthology roundup, including a major reason to visit ‘Old Venus’

March 31, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
March 31, 2019

Over the last month and a half or so, I’ve been reading a handful of anthologies. Notable among them were Galactic Empires, a 2017 publication edited by Neil Clarke themed on, well, exactly what the title says; and Infinite Stars, also from 2017, edited by Bryan Thomas Schmidt and billing itself — rather grandiosely, I thought — as “The Definitive Anthology of Space Opera and Military SF.” I enjoyed both volumes but thought the former to be stronger overall.

It’s worth devoting a moment on Schmidt’s collection because it revisits some famous science fiction universes. Infinite Stars includes a new Dune story co-written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, which I found to be particularly weak, and an original “Ender’s Game” story by Orson Scott Card, which I didn’t much enjoy but felt arrived at a haunting ending. I particularly enjoyed Nnedi Okorafor’s “Binti,” which approaches space exploration and interspecies conflict from an African perspective, and “Night Passage,” an Alastair Reynolds tale set in his “Revelation Space” saga, of which (unlike “Dune” and “Ender’s Game”) I have no knowledge.

However, the real point of this post is to share a few thoughts about Old Venus, a 2015 themed collection edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois.

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