Posts Tagged ‘Jordan Williamson’

Five victories and still going strong: Stanford keeps rivalry streak intact with 38-17 triumph over Cal in the 117th Big Game

November 24, 2014

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Nov. 24, 2014

Big Game’s luster has dwindled somewhat in recent years. Stanford walloped Cal in their 2013 meeting, 63-13; the 50-point thrashing was the largest point differential in Big Game history. It was the Cardinal’s fourth consecutive Big Game triumph; only one of those contests, Stanford’s 31-28 win in 2011, was closer than 18 points. In each of those four years, the Cardinal went on to enjoy 11 or 12 total victories.

If the 2014 matchup wasn’t quite as glamorous as it has been in past year, there were circumstances that added an element of intrigue to Saturday’s contest. The teams entered the 117th Big Game on much more even footing than of late; both sported 5-5 overall records.

But in most other ways, the teams were mirror images of one another. A 5-5 win-loss tally represented a come-up for Cal, which won only a single game in 2013; for Stanford, which finished last year 11-3 with a Rose Bowl berth, that record was a definite let-down. Cal has a prolific offense and a terrible defense; going into Saturday, Stanford’s scoring defense was ranked seventh nationally (16.5 points per game), but its offense was relatively anemic.

On Saturday afternoon in Berkeley, Stanford took a 17-point lead into the locker room at halftime — yet the game could easily have gone differently.

The visitors in white jumped out to a 10-0 lead thanks to a short Remound Wright touchdown run and Jordan Williamson’s 24-yard field goal. But on its second possession, Cal drove the length of the field and seemed poised to score.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

On dealing with disappointment: Comparing and contrasting the 2012 Fiesta Bowl and the 2013 Iron Bowl

December 4, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Dec. 4, 2013

If you’re a Stanford football fan, then you remember the Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 2, 2012. It was perhaps the most painful loss out of the handful of defeats that the Cardinal has suffered in recent years.

The final game for all-world quarterback Andrew Luck was a shootout. Twenty-four points were scored in the fourth quarter, starting with a 30-yard field goal by the Cardinal’s Jordan Williamson. Oklahoma State — which threw for 399 yards that night, but rushed for only 13 — answered with a 17-yard pass from Brandon Weeden to Justin Blackmon. That balanced the scoreboard at 31-up.

Stanford retook the lead on a short Stepfan Taylor touchdown run, but Joseph Randle’s 4-yard scoring run retied matters at 38-38.

Stanford fans had to be pretty confident at that point. Only 2:35 remained in the game, and the best signal caller in school history was under center. Surely Luck and company would march down the field and clinch the game by scoring as time expired.

That’s…not quite what happened. The team advanced 63 yards, to the Cowboys’ 17-yard line. On third down and two yards to go, with only three seconds remaining, coach David Shaw turned to Williamson, a redshirt freshman who was one for two on field goal tries to that point in the game.

Up went Williamson’s 35-yard try as the clock ran out. It missed. That brought on overtime, with the Cardinal offense going first.

Read the rest of this entry »

Stanford hangs on: With a 27-20 nailbiter of a victory over Notre Dame, the Cardinal moves to 10-2 on the year

December 2, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Dec. 2, 2013

Stanford hung on to defeat Notre Dame Saturday night by a 27-20 margin. And considering the discrepancy in offensive yards — the host Cardinal won the day, 419 yards to 263 — the “hung on” is entirely applicable. 

The game seemed to fit a template that has become very familiar in 2013. The Cardinal defense combined for one sack and four other tackles-for-loss. For the 21st time in that many games, Stanford’s opponent was held under 30 points; for the sixth straight game, the opponent did not exceed 20 points. This was the fifth consecutive game, and the ninth time this season, in which the opposing squad rushed for fewer than 100 yards (Notre Dame had 64, on Saturday evening).

Tyler Gaffney was monstrously good; he rushed 33 times for 189 yards and a touchdown, marking his eight time exceeding the century mark this year. Ty Montgomery had three catches for 46 yards, all of which went for first downs, and four kickoff returns for 127 yards, with a long of 51. Jordan Williamson hit both of his field goals (from 27 and 28 yards) and all three extra points. A seemingly healthy Devon Cajuste grabbed three balls for 75 yards, including a lovely 16-yard end zone reception on the run in which he extended himself to catch a Kevin Hogan ball that was slightly long. 

Read the rest of this entry »

The Big Game beat rolls on and on: Stanford triumphs over cal, 63-13, in a record-setting Big Game rout

November 25, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Nov. 25, 2013

The 116th edition of Big Game got off to a brisk start. Stanford put the first points on the board exactly one minute in, courtesy of Lee Ward advancing the kickoff 30 yards, a pass interference flag and Ty Montgomery’s 31-yard touchdown run. Fewer than three minutes later, california (lowercase c intentional) had matched that score with Jared Goff’s touchdown toss to Maurice Harris.

cal, alas, is a team that does many, many things wrong. That proved true upon the ensuing possession. First, there was the kickoff — a 15-yard boot that was caught at midfield with no return. On the very next play, Kevin Hogan dropped back and found Montgomery, who went the distance for a 50-yard touchdown.

Here’s how the rest of the possessions in the first quarter went:

• cal: 3 plays, minus-1 yard, punt.

• Stanford: 7 plays, 51 yards, 12-yard Montgomery touchdown pass from Hogan.

• cal: 3 plays, 5 yards, punt.

• Stanford: 3 plays, minus-2 yards, punt.

• cal: 11 plays, 83 yards, 29-yard Vincenzo D’Amato field goal.

The home team ended the first quarter up by a 21-10 margin, and things only got more lopsided from there. D’Amato would hit a 47-yard kick in the second quarter for cal’s last points of the game. But in that same period, the Cardinal added another 21 points: a 72-yard touchdown on a short Hogan-to-Montgomery connection, a 45-yard TD that Hogan tossed to Michael Rector, and a 9-yard touchdown thanks to another Hogan hookup with Montgomery.

Read the rest of this entry »

Trojans break Cardinal streak: Stanford goes down, 20-17, in a heart-breaking defeat in Los Angeles

November 22, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Nov. 20, 2013

I can’t think of le mot juste to describe Stanford’s 20-17 upset loss at USC Saturday night.

Shocking? Yes, it was that. After all, the Trojans are the team that had lost at home, 10-7, to lowly Washington State on Sept. 7. That was a game in which USC gained just 193 yards.

Devastating? Yes, it was that, too. With the Cardinal falling to 8-2 overall and 6-2 in the Pac-12 North, the team lost the primacy it had wrested from Oregon with the inspiring 26-20 victory on Nov. 7. Stanford still might advance to the conference championship game by beating california (lowercase c intentional), but that scenario now requires the Ducks to lose either to Arizona (6-4, 3-4 Pac-12 South) or Oregon State (6-4, 4-3 Pac-12 North). That is, at best, an uncertain prospect.

Expected? Oddly, this also fits. Stanford has played with fire time and again. The Cardinal dominated Oregon for roughly 50 minutes, but the final score showed just how effectively the Ducks managed to claw back into the game. In fact, with the exception of the 55-17 pasting of Washington State, virtually every win the Cardinal has had this year might have gone the other way had a handful of plays yielded different results.

Oregon State would have needed just a touchdown and a two-point conversion to tie Stanford as the clock wound down. Before Kodi’s catch was made with nearly two-thirds of the contest vs. UCLA having already been played, the score was tied, 3-3. With 1:16 left to play, a review showed (to some folks, anyway) that a fourth-down Washington pass had fallen incomplete, thereby wiping out a play that would have extended their drive for a game-tying field goal. Despite ultimately losing by 14 points, Arizona State put a huge scare into the Cardinal by ripping off three straight fourth-quarter touchdown drives. Army is 3-7 so far this year, but the Cardinal could muster only a paltry 20-13 halftime lead in the game at West Point — and that required a 47-yard Jordan Williamson field goal as time expired in the second period.

Read the rest of this entry »

Who’s got it better than Oregon? Stanford does, after a thrilling 26-20 Thursday night victory over the Ducks!

November 8, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Nov. 8, 2013

That. Was. Amazing.

How else could Stanford football fans describe Thursday night’s 26-20 victory over the second-ranked Oregon Ducks? This was a season-defining game for both teams, who together clearly represent the top echelon of both the Pac-12 North Division and, indeed, the conference itself.

Going into the game, Cardinal faithful knew that their team could prevail over the mighty Ducks; for evidence, all they had to do was cast their minds back to last season, when Kevin Hogan led his squad to a 17-14 overtime upset in his first-ever road start. But Cardinal fans also knew that a win would require Stanford to play a nearly perfect game.

That’s not exactly what the home squad turned in Thursday night; instead, the Cardinal played phenomenal ball for 50 or so minutes before all three of the team’s units suffered very significant lapses. These let-downs turned what had been a thorough beat-down of the Ducks turn into quite the nail-biter, as we shall see.

Oregon received the opening kickoff and responded by doing what the Ducks have so often done for the past four-odd years — by moving the ball with relative ease. Still, their eight-play, 35-yard possession stalled at the Stanford 48-yard line with an incomplete throw by quarterback Marcus Mariota. The Ducks punted, pinning the Cardinal to their own 6-yard line.

Alas, the red-jerseyed offense went three and out, and Bralon Addison returned the punt 25 yards to the Stanford 28-yard line. Less than five minutes into the game, Oregon had moved into scoring position.

Read the rest of this entry »

Crashing back to Earth: Revisiting reality after the 27-21 defeat at Utah

October 15, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Oct. 15, 2013

There’s no way around it. The Stanford football team’s 27-21 loss on Saturday evening to Utah was thoroughly disappointing.

The hosts outhustled and outcoached the Cardinal on virtually every level, and it showed. Name a category and the Utes owned it. They led in total yards (410-389), rushing yards (176-143), time of possession (32:54–27:06), penalties (Utah was flagged four times for 30 yards; Stanford, 6-33), turnovers (Stanford lost two fumbles, killing both of the Cardinal’s third-quarter possessions; Utah quarterback Travis Wilson was picked once) and fourth-down conversions (1-1, compared to 0-1 for Stanford).

The good news was that, despite lackluster play in the second and third quarters, fifth-ranked Stanford had a chance to win in the final minute. The bad news, of course, was that coach David Shaw’s squad could not pull it out despite being more heralded and more talented than Utah.

Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: