Posts Tagged ‘James McAvoy’

‘To sleep, perchance to dream’ — ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ remakes history with a not entirely entrancing extended catnap

June 28, 2014

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
June 28, 2014

In the year 2023, the new movie X-Men: Days of Future Past informs us, virtually everything is dimly lit, computer-animated or both. More to the point, plot-wise, giant shape-shifting robots are waging a deadly war against mutated humans and anyone sympathetic to them. The remnants of the X-Men, a group of superpowered mutants, fight a losing battle over and over: Time and again, the robotic Sentinels discover and breach their hideout, slaughtering the mutants one by one, until they reach the inner sanctum and find that…nothing has happened.

The extermination of the heroic X-Men is repeatedly undone because of the duo of napper extraordinaire Bishop (Omar Sy) and psychic Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page). She’s able to project Bishop’s consciousness into the mind of his younger body, some hours or days in the past, which allows him to warn his colleagues of the impending danger and go elsewhere ahead of the Sentinels’ arrival. History changes at the very moment Bishop wakens, meaning that each deadly assault is completely lost to the universe but for Bishop’s memory of it.

Now Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), the leader of the X-Men, has conceived a daring plan to end the war before it begins, to use the movie’s haughty phrase. Pryde will send Logan, code-name Wolverine (Hugh Jackman), into his younger body in 1973. His mission: To round up allies who will prevent the mutant Raven (Jennifer Lawrence, frequently wearing a blue bodysuit and heavy makeup) from committing the murder that triggered the destructive Sentinel-mutant war.

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Captivating ‘Atonement’ turns on a tragic mistake

October 4, 2012

About half of the film Atonement is set on a posh English country estate during a scorching 1930s day. The estate, which belongs to the Tallis family, is being visited by the Quincey children, a teenaged girl and her two younger brothers, who are cousins of the Tallises, and by two young men.

One of those men is Robbie Turner. Like middle child Cecilia Tallis, he has just graduated from university. In truth, he lives on the family estate; his late father was and his mother is a longtime household servant. In the fashion of virtually every love story involving upper-crust Britons, Turner and Cecilia must fight to acknowledge their feelings for one another.

As the youngest Tallis child, 13-year-old Briony, watches Turner and Cecilia over the course of the day, she becomes convinced that he is a sex maniac.

That night, what should be an ordinary dinner party is disrupted when everyone abruptly realizes that the two Quincey boys have run away. During a chaotic search, Briony runs across Lola Quincey being raped. Neither she nor Lola see the face of the rapist, but Briony is a girl of fierce conviction. She accuses Turner.

Cut to the French countryside some years later. The Nazis have routed the English expeditionary force; Turner and two fellow soldiers make their way to the coast to await rescue by the British navy. But that turns out to be no sure thing: The Luftwaffe is bombing troop carriers in the Channel, and thousands of men are now trapped between the water and the advancing Nazi war machine.

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