Posts Tagged ‘global war on terror’

CIA officials walk viewers through the methodical, sometimes misguided ‘Manhunt’ that led to Osama bin Laden

April 7, 2013

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 7, 2013

When commercial jet planes struck the World Trade Center and Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001, most Americans had not heard of al Qaeda or the rich Saudi Arabian who headed it.

That was not the case for the men and women of the Central Intelligence Agency unit that tracked al Qaeda’s leader. Alec Station, founded in 1995, knew that Osama bin Laden had declared war on America, and they had tied him to a number of terrorist operations around the world as the man who had either directly ordered or given other organizations funds to facilitate them. Al Qaeda itself had carried out deadly 1998 attacks against two U.S. embassies in Africa as well as one against the U.S.S. Cole.

Alec Station had been issuing warnings throughout 2001 that a large Qaeda operation, evidently targeting the United States, was in the works. Their inability to determine just what would happen, and where, would end up haunting many of the unit’s members; it also led, perhaps unfairly, to some blame for the 9/11 terror attacks being laid at their feet.

Prior to the Sept. 11 assault, the so-called Sisterhood that tracked Islamic terrorism was looked down upon by many others in the CIA. Analyst Cindy Storer tells documentary filmmaker Greg Barker in Manhunt, his new feature-length film, that she was counseled on one performance review that she was too passionate about finding bin Laden.

Once al Qaeda’s 19 hijackers brought down the Twin Towers and brought jihad to the headquarters of the world’s most powerful military, that all changed; resources poured into counterterrorism operations.

The attack on American soil prompted other modifications as well. “We changed the rule book a bit,” says former CIA field officer Marty Martin, who was brought back after 9/11 to lead the agency’s war on al Qaeda. “We were empowered more. We did get a bit more aggressive.

“My job is to kill al Qaeda,” Martin continues in the film. “Either get shoulder to shoulder with us or get out of the way.”

Yet even with these transformations, the bin Laden hunters spent nearly 10 years exploring dead ends and delving into dark places before they could find the world’s most-wanted terrorist.  Read the rest of this entry »

Prison-keepers and conscience: ‘None of Us Were Like This Before’ examines American torture and the toll it took

November 23, 2012

Freelance journalist Joshua E.S. Phillips begins his 2010 book with an innocuous report on the 2004 death of Sgt. Adam Gray, a 24-year-old native of central California. The military deemed it accidental, but his family and some of his fellow soldiers suspected otherwise.

Gray had served a year in the Middle East with a tank unit, beginning in March 2003, but his training for armored warfare was never called into play. Instead, he and his unit spent much of their time in Iraq conducting patrols and guarding prisoners. He came back a changed man, a darker person. He rarely talked about his war experiences, but when he did, he discussed torturing detainees.

Gray was stationed in Alaska when, a few weeks before his death, he tried to hang himself. On Aug. 29, 2004, he succeeded. He was found in bed with a plastic bag twisted over his head.

In None of Us Were Like This Before: American Soldiers and Torture, Phillips argues persuasively that Gray was but one of many victims — including Afghanis, Iraqis and Americans — of torture. He also explores the many reasons why Americans tortured detainees, some of the myths surrounding torture and some of the corrosive effects that torture has had on practitioners and whistle-blowers as well as those who were its subjects.

Bush administration officials deliberately loosened some of the protections for individuals captured in what they called the global war on terror. Yet the administration also portrayed soldiers who were found to have participated in torture, such as guard as the infamous Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, a few bad apples.

It now seems clear there there were far more than a few bad apples, although there remains some dispute over how much torture of detainees was official policy and how much of it was taken by low-level soldiers working on their own initiative. Phillips argues that whether officers explicitly embraced torture or not, many likely turned blind eyes to evidence of it.

Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: