Posts Tagged ‘Frederik Pohl’

Contemplating the silver-screen impact of various science fiction masters, part 1

September 16, 2016

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Sept. 16, 2016

In 1975, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America presented its first ever Grand Master Award to the prolific Robert Heinlein, who ultimately authored 32 novels and 16 anthologies. The writer, who died in 1988, is probably best known for his novels Stranger in a Strange LandThe Moon Is a Harsh Mistress and Starship TroopersLocus, a trade magazine for the science fiction, fantasy and horror publishing industry, named Heinlein its all-time best author in 1977, 1987, 1988, 1998 and 1999.

Stranger in a Strange Land, which was published in 1961, was a precursor to the sexual revolution and helped define the free-love hippie aesthetic; it also introduced the word grok (to understand profoundly and intuitively) into the language. Just two years ago, Heinlein was the subject of a 624-page authorized biography.

Heinlein was one of the indisputable legends of 20th-century science fiction, but he’s had surprisingly little influence on the world of movies. In the 35 years preceding his death, only a single Hollywood production was openly based on his work — 1953’s Project Moon Base. (That said, The Brain Eaters, released in 1958, was an uncredited adaptation of Heinlein’s novel The Puppet Masters; the author sued the producers and settled out of court, according to the invaluable Internet Movie Database.)

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The astronaut at the heart of Frederik Pohl’s ‘Gateway’ finds himself at the mercy of a perilous but indifferent universe

March 28, 2015

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
March 28, 2015

Frederik Pohl’s 1977 novel, Gateway, which was originally serialized in the magazine Galaxy, is a landmark work of science fiction. It swept all of the genre’s top honors, the Hugo, Nebula, Locus and Campbell awards.

The book contains two tales, which appear in alternating chapters. They’re both narrated by Robinette Broadhead, and each covers a different time period. The odd-numbered chapters revolve around Broadhead’s weekly appointments with “Sigfrid von Shrink,” which is what the narrator calls his computer psychotherapist. This Broadhead, who lives in an exclusive, domed borough of New York City, is a fabulously wealthy retiree. His main pursuits are bedding women and turning the tables on Sigfrid. Sometimes these activities converge, such as when he romances a computer specialist who knows how to bypass key parts Sigfrid’s programming.

The main topic of discussion — or evasion, given Broadhead’s reluctance to engage any subject that makes him uncomfortable — is related in the even-numbered chapters. These are the experiences of young Broadhead, a cash-strapped Wyoming food miner on an overcrowded, far-future Earth. At least, that’s Broadhead’s unpleasant lot in life until he wins the lottery. The 26-year-old immediately spends the bulk of his $250,000 prize on a one-way ticket to an alien asteroid, where he hopes to find unimaginable wealth as a prospector.

His destination is an ancient outpost called Gateway. It was built by the Heechee, a mysterious alien species that has been extinct — or at least absent — for many millennia. Little is known about this race, including what happened to them. No other living intelligent alien life has ever been found.

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