Posts Tagged ‘Chris Christie’

Cheeps and Chirps — belated July 2016 Republican National Convention edition!

August 11, 2016

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Aug. 11, 2016

Twitter feed, represent!

Sadly, this could be an evergreen tweet

 

• Reminder: The U.S. is still at war

 

• Comedy!

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Memo to Donald: Everyone loves a mischievous television scamp

June 18, 2016

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
June 18, 2016

Yesterday, I surveyed the troubled state of the campaign of New York real-estate mogul and reality-TV star Donald Trump. Today, I wanted to offer a modest proposal aimed at revitalizing his run for the presidency.

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that Trump is a master at grabbing the attention of the news media, largely because he says a lot of outrageous things. It’s a truth nearly as widely accepted, however, that an alarmingly high proportion of the outrageous things he says earn him condemnation.

My solution is simple: Turn the candidate’s liability into an asset by casting Trump as an archetypal sitcom character that everyone recognizes and loves.

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Tax deductions and magical thinking: When smart policy makes for unpopular politics

October 10, 2015

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
Oct. 10, 2015

Republican tax plans all seem to have something in common — something besides lowering the top individual and corporate income-tax rates, that is. See if you can spot it.

Real estate mogul and reality TV host Donald Trump’s tax plan aims to lower taxes and to simplify the tax code. Trump’s proposal claims that its “tax cuts are fully paid for by:”

1. Reducing or eliminating most deductions and loopholes available to the very rich.…

3. Reducing or eliminating corporate loopholes that cater to special interests, as well as deductions made unnecessary or redundant by the new lower tax rate on corporations and business income…

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s tax proposal would:

• Simplify the tax code for all Americans to lessen the power of the IRS and increase both prosperity and fairness.

• Reduce loopholes and special tax provisions created by lobbyists that invariably benefit those at the top.

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The Pulitzer Prize winner, the faux journalist and the governor of the Garden State: Reflections on a short video investigation

April 14, 2014

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 14, 2014

The other day, I ruminated at length about the similarities between former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and current New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. But there’s something that I left out of the story that’s been lingering in my mind for the past several weeks. That something is a 2011 video by would-be conservative journalist James O’Keefe criticizing a Newark Star-Ledger journalist (and adjunct Columbia University journalism professor) Amy Ellis Nutt.

Nutt won a Pulitzer Prize in 2011 for a series of feature stories called “The Wreck of the Lady Mary,” which chronicled the sinking of a fishing boat in which six men drowned. After describing how she wrote that story as part of a public panel discussion at Columbia’s Journalism School, which administers the Pulitzers, Nutt was recorded in what she thought was a private conversation.

It turns out that Nutt was speaking not with a cub reporter, as she apparently thought, but with a plant working for “Project Veritas,” O’Keefe’s quasi-journalistic enterprise. The decoy, as O’Keefe calls him, covertly took video of Nutt saying that it’s important to re-elect President Obama and disparaging Christie.

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Giuliani vs. Christie: Two GOP politicians from the Northeast have lots in common

April 11, 2014

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 11, 2014

In 2007, when I was working as a newspaper reporter in a small North Carolina town, my editor asked me if I was excited that Rudy Giuliani, a fellow New Yorker, might become president. I scoffed.

There were two reasons for this. One was that I thought Giuliani, the former New York City mayor, would never be able to win the Republican nomination. The other was that I thought Giuliani was temperamentally ill-suited to serve as president.

Giuliani became known as America’s mayor for his performance on Sept. 11, 2001, when he provided a calm and steadying voice even as President George W. Bush temporarily disappeared from view. A former U.S. attorney who had successfully prosecuted mafiosi, Giuliani was a Republican who presided over one of the nation’s most Democratic cities. His mayoralty coincided with — and, to be fair, helped prompt — the renaissance of the Big Apple. Unemployment in the city dropped nearly 40 percent during the 1990s; in the same period, assault also fell 40 percent, and rates of murder, robbery, car theft and burglary all dropped by 66 percent to 73 percent.

That’s all well and good, although it remains an open question just how much Giuliani’s leadership had to do with those declines. But while these positives were well-publicized, fewer Americans outside of the New York-New Jersey area were acquainted with the mayor’s negatives. In mid-2000, upon separating from his second wife, Giuliani moved out of Gracie Mansion and into the apartment of a gay couple. He had a penchant for dressing up in drag. Giuliani was essentially moderate — which is to say, liberal, at least in the context of the post–Bush-the-younger Republican Party — on issues such as gay rights, abortion, gun control and immigration. Giuliani’s family situation — by 2007, he was largely estranged from his children, and he was on his third marriage — was no help. One particularly damning episode involved his announcement to the press of his aforementioned separation from his second wife, which preceded the mayor’s actually informing said wife of their split.

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