Archive for April, 2019

To sleep, perchance to change the world? Ursula Le Guin plumbs the depths of subconsciousness to little effect in ‘The Lathe of Heaven’

April 30, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 30, 2019

In 2002, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America designated Ursula K. Le Guin as a grand master. The American was the 20th author to win the honor but only the second woman, after Andre Norton in 1983. Despite her prestige and influence — Le Guin, who died last year at age 87, was named a living legend by the U.S. Library of Congress two years before she was honored by SFWA — I’ve only read a handful of her tales, mostly in the form of short fiction included in anthologies.

Le Guin’s sixth novel was The Lathe of Heaven. Unlike the preceding volumes, four of which established the Hainish or League of All Worlds universe and one of which launched the Earthsea saga, this 1971 narrative is a stand-alone story about one George Orr. This mild-mannered draftsman from Portland, Ore., seems thoroughly average in every way but one: He’s afraid of his own dreams.

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Human evolution moves in new and strange ways in ‘Central Station,’ Lavie Tidhar’s loosely linked 2016 novel about future Tel Aviv

April 29, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 29, 2019

Central Station, Lavie Tidhar’s 2016 novel, is a rambling meditation on the nature of humanity and the possible directions our species might take in the coming decades.

Tidhar envisions a future Israel that has been apportioned and has achieved a measure of stability. Palestine includes what has become the city of Jaffa, while Jews retain the remainder of Tel Aviv and other parts of today’s Israeli territory. The space port of Central Station straddles the two cities, uniting and dividing them, funneling people and goods both into and out of the sector.

The port serves as a gateway to colonies all around the solar system. But that doesn’t entirely explain Central Station’s amazing diversity: The neighborhood boasts creatures of many ethnicities and native tongues. Some of these are very familiar, others are fantastic and still others are wholly intangible — and a number, like the port, straddle different categories of existence.

Tidhar, an Israeli, begins to outline Central Station’s huge variety with this passage near the start of his book:

The rain caught them by surprise. The space port, this great white whale, like a living mountain rising out of the urban bedrock, drew onto itself the formation of clouds, its very own miniature weather system. Like islands in the ocean, space ports saw localized rains, cloudy skies, and a growth industry of mini-farms growing like lichen on the side of their vast edifices. 

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‘Broken Angels,’ Richard K. Morgan’s sequel to ‘Altered Carbon,’ puts his hero in jeopardy on a war-torn colony world

April 22, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 22, 2019

About four months ago, I reviewed Altered Carbon, the breakout debut novel by British science fiction and fantasy author Richard K. Morgan. Last week, my local library hold on a digital copy of the sequel, Broken Angels, and I’m happy to report that it’s just as entertaining as its predecessor.

The second book, which was published in the U.S. the same year as Morgan’s first, 2003, is set on the war-wracked colony planet Sentinel IV roughly 30 years after the events of Altered Carbon. The story opens when narrator Takeshi Kovacs, a soldier with a freighted past, is approached while recuperating from wounds sustained in a savage local civil war being fought between a cartel and insurrectionists. This individual has a proposition for Kovacs that concerns an artifact left behind by an apparently extinct alien race whose remains humans have been uncovering and attempting to interpret for centuries:

“[A]ny decent archaeologue who wants to make a killing is going to head for the centers of habitation, and that’s what they all did.” 

“How do you know all this, Schneider? You’re not an archaeologue.” 

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Humanity makes a sudden and unexpected splash on the interstellar scene in Patrick Tomlinson’s science-fiction novel ‘Gate Crashers’

April 13, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 13, 2019

Patrick S. Tomlinson’s 2018 science-fiction story, Gate Crashers, is an uneven but promising work.

At the heart of the book is a slight twist on a familiar premise: Homo sapiens discover an alien device and use it to reverse-engineer revolutionary technologies, including faster-than-light travel. Tomlinson’s novelty is that the object is discovered in deep space — literally the middle of nowhere — by humanity’s most ambitious crewed extrasolar flight. However, the crew is not alone…

…and not just because there are aliens about.

Due to the miracle of quantum entanglement radio, or QER (for which read: ansible), which enables instantaneous communication, the crew of the American/European Union Starship Magellan is able to share its discovery with a small group of scientists at the American/European Space Space Administration, the 24th century’s successor to NASA. The ground-based team of whiz kids team up with the astronauts to unlock amazing secrets.

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A time-traveling federal agent doggedly pursues justice in Tom Sweterlitsch’s gripping novel ‘The Gone World’

April 12, 2019

By Matthew E. Milliken
MEMwrites.wordpress.com
April 12, 2019

I’d never heard of Pittsburgh science-fiction author Tom Sweterlitsch until I stumbled across a library catalog listing for his second novel, 2018’s The Gone World. Having read the book last month, however, I’m prepared to say that he’s a force to be reckoned with in the genre.

Sweterlitsch’s debut book, Tomorrow and Tomorrow, concerned a man who investigates unexplained deaths in a virtual recreation of a destroyed city. The Gone World is a complex time-travel mystery in which a Naval Criminal Investigative Service agent attempts to apprehend a SEAL accused of slaughtering his wife and children.

The protagonist here, Shannon Moss, is uniquely qualified to investigate the 1997 triple homicide. Like suspect Patrick Mursult, Moss trained to sail with Naval Space Command, a classified U.S. military fleet capable of probing the distant reaches of time and space. Moss was diverted to NCIS after her first solo excursion on a far-future Earth ended in a bizarre injury that resulted in the partial amputation of her left leg.

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